Sulbutiamine Powder

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  • Sulbutiamine Powder
  • Sulbutiamine Powder
  • Sulbutiamine Powder
$12.29
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Description

Ingredient List: Sulbutiamine Powder

Sulbutiamine is a molecule which is two Thiamine (B1) molecules bound together, similar to how Pyritinol is two Pyridoxine (B6) molecules bound together. Sulbutiamine is known as isobutyryl thiamine disulfide and sometimes referred to by its Brand Names of Ereon or Arcalion; it is most commonly used for Asthenia, or weakness (part neurological and part myopathic) as well as treatment of somatic and psychic inhibition.[2] It is said to not possess psychostimulant properties, although it is designed to act centrally (in the brain).[2] Sulbutiamine is synthesized from Thiamine, where after opening of the thiazole ring of Thiamine and dimerisation to a disulfide compound it is then esterified.[3]

In a model of BALB/c mice 14-16 weeks of age, 10 days of 300mg/kg sulbutiamine by oral gavage with 5% gum acacia appeared to improve memory (assessed by operant task); this study noted that there were no differences between groups in acquisition but there were significant differences in retention which resulted in increased performance.[4]

 

Study: Evidence for a modulatory effect of sulbutiamine on glutamatergic and dopaminergic cortical transmissions in the rat brain.[2]
Abstract - Chronic treatment of rats by sulbutiamine induced no change in density of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and (+/-)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptors in the cingular cortex, but a significant decrease of the kainate binding sites, as measured by quantitative autoradiography. In the same treated animals, an increase of D1 dopaminergic (DA) binding sites was measured both in the prefrontal and the cingular cortex, while no modification of the D2 binding sites was detected. Furthermore, an acute sulbutiamine administration induced a decrease of kainate binding sites but no change of the density of D1 and D2 DA receptors. Acute sulbutiamine injection led to a decrease of the DA levels in the prefrontal cortex and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid levels in both the cingular and the prefrontal cortex. These observations are discussed in terms of a modulatory effect of sulbutiamine on both dopaminergic and glutamatergic cortical transmissions.[2]

Study: Determination of sulbutiamine and its disulfide derivatives in human plasma by HPLC using on-line post-column reactors and fluorimetric detection[3]
Abstract - A new direct HPLC procedure for the simultaneous determination of sulbutiamine (Arcalion) and other thiamine disulfides in human plasma has been developed. The method involves an automated solidphase extraction on octadecylsilyl (C18) cartridges and chromatographic separation of the compounds on an RP Select B column with gradient elution using methanol and phosphate buffer. Detection was by fluorescence of the resulting thiochromes obtained from two on-line post-column reactors. Optimization of post-column reaction parameters has been achieved. This method has been proved to be highly selective for the determination of the thiamine disulfide derivatives and quantitation limits of 5 ng·ml−1 were obtained for each compound in human plasma. Linearity was in the range 5–200 ng·ml−1. Precision and accuracy were also demonstrated by within-day and between-day assays, and showed the good reliability of the method.[3]

Study: Chronic administration of sulbutiamine improves long term memory formation in mice: possible cholinergic mediation.[4]
Abstract - Thiamine deficiency in both man and animals is known to produce memory dysfunction and cognitive disorders which have been related to an impairment of cholinergic activity. The present experiment was aimed at testing whether, inversely, chronic administration of large doses of sulbutiamine would have a facilitative effect on memory and would induce changes in central cholinergic activity. Accordingly mice received 300 mg/kg of sulbutiamine daily for 10 days. They were then submitted to an appetitive operant level press conditioning test. When compared to control subjects, sulbutiamine treated mice learned the task at the same rate in a single session but showed greatly improved performance when tested 24 hr after partial acquisition of the same task. Parallel neurochemical investigations showed that the treatment induced a slight (+ 10%) but significant increase in hippocampal sodium-dependent high affinity choline uptake. The present findings and previous results suggest that sulbutiamine improves memory formation and that this behavioral effect could be mediated by an increase in hippocampal cholinergic activity.[4]

Citation & Resources:
1. https://examine.com/supplements/sulbutiamine

2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10996447

3. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF02263856

4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4059305

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration. This product is not approved by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any diseases.

WARNING: 
Keep out of the reach of children. Do not take this or any other compound if under the age of 18, pregnant or nursing a baby, or if you have any known or suspected medical conditions and/or taking prescription drug(s) or OTC medication(s). Always consult with a qualified health physician before taking any new compound.

Statements & Warnings

† These statements have not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any diseases.

WARNING: 
Keep out of the reach of children. Do not take this or any other supplement if under the age of 18, pregnant or nursing a baby, or if you have any known or suspected medical conditions and/or taking prescription drug(s) or OTC medication(s). Always consult with a qualified health physician before taking any new dietary supplement.

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